Discussing
How Christian Intellectuals Can Get Their Groove Back

Branson Parler

Branson Parler
September 7, 2016

Our efforts to preserve faithfulness should not come at the expense of being missional.

JKana
September 7, 2016

This post should be required reading for all first-year undergrad students at a Christian university. I've never read such an incisive exposition of the premise of intellectual mission.

Bravo, Branson.

Richard Euson
September 7, 2016

N.T. Wrights immediately comes to mind as one who, like C.S. Lewis, is trying to set forth an understanding of Christianity, and especially of its connection to the Kingdom of God proclaimed and inaugurated by Jesus, that speaks to contemporary concerns and sensibilities. Unfortunately, the media culture by and large isn't interested in putting NTW before the public, preferring instead to parade Westboro Baptist Church as representatives of Christianity.

Part of the problem is, of course, that our contemporary, secular culture has forgotten (if they ever knew) how deeply their roots are in "Christendom." Atheist Delusions by David Bentley Hart and For The Glory of God by Rodney Stark should be required reading for the cultured despisers. They are spending the intellectual and moral capital earned by the Christian Church over the centuries for a bowl of pottage. What will they do when the bowl is empty? To what transcendent principles will they appeal if and when they succeed in deconstructing morality itself and find their post-modern offspring turning on them? Who will guard the self-appointed guardians when the barbarians are at the gate?

Fred Hickok
September 7, 2016

Ravi Zacharias certainly fits the bill for the kind of person called for in this article. Perhaps the fact the the secular noise that grows and grows an more and more drowns out the Christian message may explain why he and others are not heard as much as C.S. Lewis was.

Davies
September 8, 2016

The "groove" has always been the same since the first gospel message was preached. But today's technology has deceived the majority of fallen mankind into thinking they do not need to embrace a belief in a Supreme Being. There is an ongoing fascination with their own ability to come up with innovative devices to control the global population. "Power corrupts, and absolute power corrupts absolutely". No longer do we only hear of dictators ruling different countries, but now, thanks to people like Edward Snowden and others, it is becoming evident that there is an oligarchy ( the 1% of 1%? ) that are determined to rule the rest of us, and their ideas in regards on what to do with to the rest of us are based on their cumulative superiority complex. Without a doubt, technology has enabled the self appointed "elite" to deaden their consciences to the TRUE reason for our existence as human beings.

Ashley Tauriac
September 8, 2016

Beautifully put. How much further would we get as thinking of ourselves as ambassadors in society rather than hiding or angering the very people we were meant to serve?

Joe Hinman
September 24, 2016

That guy is typically uninformed. There are several figures who either died recently or are still living who fill the bill. Alvin Plantinga, the late William Alston, William Abaham.

Dutch Rikkers
September 29, 2016

Very well put! Of course it is also true that there are simply too many voices--far more than when Lewis wrote. And the West was hurting from WWII with many willing to listen to a message of hope. Distraction by technology and toys also keeps many from hearing the clarion voice of truth. Commercialism is also a cancer eating into our capacity to hear what is most important. The fact that "Think Christian" appears in my email promotions file is an indicator of that. Modern science also presents challenges to simplistic understandings of the Scriptures--making many conservative evangelicals put their fingers in their ears. And that brings us to the whole arena of science denial (global climate change, environmental decline, and so forth) coupled with the conflation of Christianity with right-wing politics. The respondent above mentions Alvin Plantinga as being a faithful voice in the public square (I live near Calvin College where Plantinga rose to a position of esteem), but probably not one Christian in a hundred knows his name.

Dutch Rikkers
September 29, 2016

In Reply to Joe Hinman (comment #29226)
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I doubt that the author is uninformed--especially about Alvin Plantinga. He teaches at Kuyper College and is likely as Reformed in his theology. Kuyper is only a few miles north of Calvin College, to which Plantinga has returned in retirement. I consider myself well-educated and well-read, but find Plantinga's most "intellectual" writings beyond my grasp. My son and I once attended a Plantinga lecture at Calvin. Neither of us could repeat what he was saying, and we finally left at the beginning of Q and A session. I said to me son, "If we can't even understand the question, it's not likely we'll understand the answer!" Lewis had the capacity to make deep subjects understandable, but also entertaining, in a sense.

Joe Hinman
January 26, 2017

In Reply to Dutch Rikkers (comment #29242)
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Ican only go by what he said in his piece.

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